Download Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World by Gary Indiana PDF

By Gary Indiana

In the summertime of 1962, Andy Warhol unveiled 32 Soup Cans in his first solo exhibition on the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles—and despatched the paintings international reeling. The responses ran from incredulity to outrage; the poet Taylor Mead defined the exhibition as “a excellent slap within the face to America.” The exhibition positioned Warhol at the map—and remodeled American tradition ceaselessly. nearly single-handedly, Warhol collapsed the centuries-old contrast among “high” and “low” tradition, and created a brand new and substantially sleek aesthetic.In Andy Warhol and the Can that offered the World, the dazzlingly flexible critic Gary Indiana tells the tale of the genesis and impression of this iconic murals. With power, wit, and super perspicacity, Indiana recovers the excitement and controversy of the Pop paintings Revolution and the intense, tormented, and profoundly narcissistic determine at its forefront.

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Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World

In the summertime of 1962, Andy Warhol unveiled 32 Soup Cans in his first solo exhibition on the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles—and despatched the artwork global reeling. The responses ran from incredulity to outrage; the poet Taylor Mead defined the exhibition as “a superb slap within the face to the USA.

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In the arts and in criticism about the arts, the ambition is different; it is to latch on to those features of the material environment to which a sensory response is the only one available but which are nonetheless capable of being non-accidentally shared, shareable because of their rightness, so to speak. Thus, the reason why there is a dislocation between patterns of support and convergence in a conclusion upon which all can agree in aesthetic matters is that the structure of empirical features constituting the object judged—its being composed of just these sounds or just those shapes and colors in that sequence—is also, at the same time, a structure or order or logic of feeling that demands or calls for a certain (sensuous) response in 47 Tast y the perceiver.

That said, purposiveness without purpose is precisely the thought necessary to make sense of the “decorative,” what is designed but without function. Purposiveness without purpose is equally the engine making abstract art possible. , 219. ” 52 J. M. Bernstein 14 Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985), 288. , 290. , 291. 17 For one of my attempts to demonstrate the possibility and significance of nondiscursive cognition see my Against Voluptuous Bodies: Late Modernism and the Meaning of Painting (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2006).

A direct spinoff of this paradigm is the explosion of aesthetic practices and scholarship that treat the most individualized of surfaces, namely skin, as a site for creative and cultural expression. The notion of treating skin as a site of signification is certainly not new. 12 The skin was, so to speak, a stratum on which was inscribed a widely legible social code. In the agora, it was entirely possible to be inappropriately naked, or properly nude. But if skin as a site for cultural signification is not new, scholarship on it is.

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